Typography is a tricky game, but when you get it right it is oh-so-satisfying. Whether you're designing street art, a logo for an advert, or infographics for Instagram, there is without a doubt a certain knack for great typography. As always, practice makes perfect.

But if you are looking for specific advice that goes a bit further than that, we have reached out to four creators who have kindly offered up their expertise. They include:

Jdrr Design who submitted to ‘Create unique lettering and typography’. 

Dominique Vari who was a selected creator for ‘Create unique lettering and typography’. 

John Langton who was a selected creator for ‘Create unique letterform artwork inspired by the upcoming biopic RESPECT’.

Annette Smith who was a selected creator for ‘Create unique letterform artwork inspired by the upcoming biopic RESPECT’.

1. Try using the ‘design thinking’ technique

What is design thinking? Well, the process goes something like this: first, fully understand the problem (in this case, the brief); second, explore a wide range of possible solutions; third; prototype and test; and finally; implement the design. 

“At university I learnt about the problem-solving method called ‘design thinking’”, explains Jdrr Design. “I try to include all of its steps in my creative process in order to understand what the consumer or client needs”. 

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2. Remember that artwork will rarely, if ever, feel finished

Feel like you’ve been stuck on the same design for days? Don’t know when enough is enough? That’s simply the curse of the artist I am afraid. 

“Most artwork is never finished,” explains John. “There comes a point where you need to just pull the plug". 

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3. A broad brief is both a blessing and a curse

“The difficulty these days is that the brief is generally so open that there will always be thousands of ways to answer the brief,” explains Dominique. 

“With an open brief, it’s much harder. I would always say 1. Understand the target audience, 2. Ensure the design is relevant to the look and feel of the brand, 3. Try to find a unique or novel difference to stand out from the crowd."

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However, while the brief is important Annette recommends to not get too wrapped up in the details and trust your artistic intuition.

“I really only read the brief details for the ‘do’s’ and ‘don’ts’ and ‘things to consider’ etc. But that information is provided for everyone to read and use, so whatever idea I get for a creative brief, along with the knowledge that everyone’s artwork won’t be carbon copies of each other, is what I go by."

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4. Consider other submissions and how different artists responded to the same brief 

As Dominique says, “at the end of the day, it often simply comes down to right time, right place, right brief”.

If you are able to get it, feedback from the client is always a great way to improve your work for next time but it’s also important to remember that if you don’t get selected it does not mean the work is not good enough. 

Some great advice from Dominique is to look at the selected work and identify how you might have been able to respond to the brief in a different way. 

As Jdrr Design explains, “Each process teaches me a lot, so I learn from my mistakes and try to do better next time. It’s not always about winning but about improving”.

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